Sclerolaena intricata (R.H.Anderson) A.J.Scott

Feddes Repert. 89: 113 (1978) APNI

Taxonomic status:Accepted

Occurrence status:Present

Establishment means:Native

Threat status:Victoria: vulnerable (v)

Much-branched, rounded shrub to c. 40 cm high, branches glabrous except for cottony axils. Leaves often rather sparse, linear, 10–15 mm long, flat or slightly concave on upper surface, acute at apex, narrowly winged and cottony at base, otherwise glabrous. Fruiting perianth glabrous except for limb; tube hard, 3–6 mm long, obliquely attached and decurrent along branch, attachment concave; limb erect, 1–2 mm long, finely pubescent; spines 4 or 5, widely spreading or recurved, the 3 longer 7–15 mm long, the shorter adaxially placed and 1–5 mm long. Fruits Oct.-Nov (7 records).

MSB. Also NT, Qld, NSW, SA. Apparently confined to Neds Corner Station, Walpolla Is. and areas immediately north of Lake Wallawalla in the far north-west. Usually a colonising species favouring heavy soils, often in proximity to communities that are subject to least some flooding.

Sclerolaena articulata, to which Victorian plants of this species were formerly assigned, was segregated from S. intricata in having 3 rather than 4 or 5 spines on the fruiting perianth. This feature has been shown to be unreliable and the earlier name (S. intricata) adopted for plants of either species.

Source: Walsh, N.G. (1996). Chenopodiaceae. In: Walsh, N.G.; Entwisle, T.J. (eds), Flora of Victoria Vol. 3, Dicotyledons Winteraceae to Myrtaceae. Inkata Press, Melbourne.
Updated by: Val Stajsic, 2019-05-20
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Distribution map

Victoria

Source: AVH (2014). Australia's Virtual Herbarium, Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria, <http://avh.chah.org.au>. Find Sclerolaena intricata in AVH ; Victorian Biodiversity Atlas, © The State of Victoria, Department of Environment and Primary Industries (published Dec. 2014) Find Sclerolaena intricata in Victorian Biodiversity Atlas
  Bioregion Occurrence status Establishment means
Murray Scroll Belt present native